Housing

  • An apartment or suite usually has one or more bedrooms. All apartments and suites have a kitchen, a bathroom, and a living room. Suites for rent may be in an apartment building or in a house.
  • Studios or bachelor suites have one room with a kitchen area and a bathroom.
  • A duplex is a house divided into two separate apartments. It may be bought or rented.
  • A condominium (condo) is a type of real estate divided into several units that are each separately owned. This could be in one building or several buildings.
  • A townhouse is a small house joined to other small houses. It may be bought or rented.
  • A room for rent is usually in a shared house or apartment. Everyone shares the kitchen and bathroom.

For people living here permanently, the Whistler Housing Authority (WHA) offers long-term rental and ownership housing opportunities that are much cheaper than houses or apartments on the open market. You can only rent or buy these properties if you are Canadian citizens or landed immigrant (permanent resident), and live and work in Whistler.

To rent or buy you will need to sign up with the Whistler Housing Authority. There is often a waiting list. Check the Whistler Housing Authority website to see how to qualify and other information.

To see what’s available, check out the classified ads in the back of local publications available for free around town or online:

  • The Pique newsmagazine
  • Craigslist, an online classified advertisements website with sections devoted to jobs, housing, personals, for sale, items wanted, services, community and discussion forums.
  • Look for advertisements posted on notice boards in your community, such as in local supermarkets, coffee shops or at your workplace.
  • Talk to people you know and ask them to network for you.
  • Join FB groups such as Whistler housing rentals for locals, Whistler Rental Houses

Before you rent, go to the Tenants BC website so you know your rights and responsibilities as a tenant.

When you rent, your landlord should ask you to sign a tenancy agreement. The tenancy agreement explains what you have agreed for:

  • The rent (how much it is each month)
  • What is included (For example, it should say if the apartment is furnished. You should ask for a list of items that the landlord is providing and check that they are there, and their condition.)
  • What utilities (bills/extra expenses) you will pay, such as hydro (electricity), internet, snow clearing etc.
  • What date the rental agreement starts (and ends).
  • How you give notice to leave the apartment and how much notice you must give
  • How the landlord can give you notice to leave the apartment and how much notice the landlord must give you
  • Damage or security deposit required, etc.

You should ask to sign an agreement based on the BC Tenancy Act.  There is a standard format agreement.

Rental Rules

If you are not asked to sign a BC Tenancy Agreement, there are still strict rules about how much deposit and how much notice time you need to give when you move out.  A landlord also has to follow the rules.

  • A landlord needs to write to you and give you details of time and day before he can enter your home.
  • A landlord has to tell you that he wants you to move out. He must give you enough time.
  • A landlord must follow the rules which say how often they can raise the rent, and how much they can raise the rent.
  • A landlord can ask for the first month’s rent and a half-month for a damage deposit before you move in. They cannot legally ask for more.

Be aware! If you are renting and sharing a kitchen and bathroom with the landlord, the landlord does not have to follow these rules.

Before you rent

Make sure you know all the above.  Read and print this Fact Sheet. It tells you what you should know about renting in British Columbia.

If you are having problems or feel a landlord is treating you unfairly, contact the Residential Tenancy Branch at 1-800-665-8779. You can also contact the Tenant Resource & Advisory Centre (TRAC) at 1-800-665-1186 or www.tenants.bc.ca.

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Have a Question?

Contact our Settlement Worker
or drop in to the Welcome Centre at the Whistler Public Library

Monday 3 – 6 p.m and Friday 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m.

WHISTLER WELCOME CENTRE

A helpful, friendly and practical service that will support you while you adjust to your new life in Canada. Welcome Centre services are for eligible clients and are free of charge.

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