Pancakes around the world

This year’s Festival food theme was “Pancakes around the world”. People were watching our chefs preparing the pancakes in front of them. There are so many types of pancakes such as Polish, Chinese, French, Swedish, Thai, Indian etc. Our community got to try 3 kinds of pancakes from 3 countries nowhere else to be bought in Whistler. We chose Czech, Korean and Russian as we have people from these countries living in Whistler too.

Czech “Bramboraky “ or fried potato-garlic- marjoram pancakes are very popular either in Czech Republic or Slovakia (knows as “Zemiakove placky”). They’re served either at lunch time, dinner or during the day as a snack. Potato is one of the basic staples in Czech cuisine, commonly used in many dishes.

Korean Kimchi pancakes or “Kimchi Jeon” are savoury pancakes served with a lot’s of kimchi in it. Because kimchi is made of fermented veggies with its main ingredient cabbage, it’s also very healthy and therefore commonly eaten any time of the day. You can find them anywhere in Asia with slight variations.

Our sweet version of pancakes was Russian “Blinis” and they got sold out almost immediately. Traditionally they’re prepared in a savoury way, filled with cottage cheese, sour cream, quark, butter, caviar (whitefish, salmon or sturgeon caviar) and other garnishes. They can be rolled as French crepes or served as a triangle.

See below Bramboraky recipe and pictures. Our chef Petr from the Czech Republic has been in the cooking industry for a long time and he’s so good that he even introduced this recipe to one of the Whistler’s restaurants he used to work at and they included it on the menu! We’re lucky to have him helping us at the Festival. It took a long time to peel and shred 15 kg of potatoes but it was worth it!

Bramboraky

Ingredients for 10 pancakes:

  • 1kg potatoes
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tsp of salt, 1 tsp of pepper
  • 1 tsp marjoram
  • 4 cloves garlic
  • 1/3 cup all-purpose flour
  • canola oil for frying

Method:

  1. Peel and coarsely grate the potatoes, squeezing out as much liquid as you can. Transfer the shredded potatoes to a mixing bowl. Stir in the crushed garlic, salt, and marjoram.
  2. Add the eggs to the potatoes and stir well to combine. Gradually mix in the flour to form a thick but still pourable batter.
  3. Heat the oil in a skillet over medium-high heat; the oil should be about 1/4-inch deep. Spoon about 1/4 cup of batter into the hot oil, flattening it slightly. Fry the pancake until golden brown, about 3 minutes on each side. Drain on paper towels. Taste the first pancake and adjust the seasoning if necessary; repeat with remaining batter.

“LUGAW” (Filipino Chicken Porridge)

At our December Multicultural Community Kitchen, Marie from the Philippines taught us how to prepare Lugaw – Chicken Porridge with Turmeric. Lugaw is a Filipino rice porridge, that works as an excellent base for any kind of meat or seasonings. This Filipino dish is traditionally thought of as a soft food for sick people. But Lugaw is enjoyed for breakfast, as a snack, when you’re sick, and even as a meal in itself. Meat is added to the rice for nutritional value, and ginger and turmeric are favorite ingredients also for their health benefits.


There are 3 steps in cooking Lugaw

Cooking the rice

INGREDIENTS (for 6 people)

  • 2 cups of sticky rice

INSTRUCTIONS

Cook rice in a steamer. If you don’t have a steamer, put 2 cups of rice and 3 cups of water in a pan. Bring to the boil, cover and cook for 20 minutes. Set aside.

At the same time, boil 4 eggs (for the garnish).

Cooking the chicken

INGREDIENTS (for 6 people)

  • 4 chicken breasts (boned) (or leave on the bone for more flavour)
  • 3 garlic cloves (chopped)
  • 1 piece ginger (how much), peeled and sliced lengthwise
  • 2 cups of chicken bouillon
  • 4 cups of water
  • 3 tsp turmeric
  • 5 tsp olive oil
  • 1 small onion chopped

INSTRUCTIONS

Heat 5 tsp of olive oil in a casserole. Sauté the onion, garlic, and ginger. Add chicken cut into pieces. Let the juice come out, then turn the chicken over. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Fry until golden brown. Add 4 cups of water, 2 cups of chicken bouillon and the steamed rice to the casserole. Add 3 tsp of turmeric. Mix all the ingredients. Cover for ten minutes or until thoroughly cooked. Simmer.

Serving and Garnishing

Serve chicken and rice in a bowl. Sprinkle some chopped scallions on top, add slices of boiled egg and squeeze some lemon over it.

Eat while hot. Enjoy!

OKONOMIYAKI (Savory Japanese pancakes)

We invited Rumi from Japan to teach us how to prepare Okonomiyaki at one of our Multicultural Community Kitchens. This dish is sometimes called Japanese pizza or Japanese pancakes. You can prepare your filling and toppings however you like it. This is also why it is translated from Japanese as “Grill as you like it”. Okonomi stands for “as you like” and yaki for “grill”.

Ingredients for 2 people: (2 different kinds – pork and seafood)

 

1 cup flour

15g cornstarch
1g salt
1g sugar
5g fish stock powder
¾ cup water
75g sliced lean pork

75g seafood (shrimp, octopus, squid)
¼ cabbage
10g green onion
2 eggs

Okonomi sauce

Japanese mayo

dried bonito flakes

 

Pork Okonomiyaki

  1. Chop the cabbage and onions (small)
  2. Put flour, water, cornstarch, salt, sugar, fish stock powder and eggs into a mixing bowl and mix well
  3. Add cabbage and onions
  4. Mix softly
  5. Medium heat frying pan – add vegetable oil –put in one layer of pork and add one scoop of mixture to cover the pork
  6. After 2- 3 minutes at medium heat turn over, then cover pan and cook for 4-5 minutes
  7. Top with dried bonito flakes, Okonomi sauce and Japanese mayo

Seafood Okonomiyaki

  1. Chop the cabbage
  2. Put into the mixing bowl
  3. Put in the water
  4. Put in the cabbage, green onions, egg.
  5.  Bake for 3 minutes at medium heat.
  6. Turn over, Lib and steam for 3 minutes
  7. Top with dried bonito flakes, Okonomi sauce and Japanese mayo

“PICANTE DE POLLO” (Bolivian Spicy Chicken)

At our November Multicultural Community Kitchen, Carla taught us how to prepare Picante de Pollo – the national dish of Bolivia. This chicken dish with green peas, onions and peppers, is eaten with rice and chuño; freeze-dried potatoes traditionally made in Bolivia and Peru. This pot dish is also healthy and quick to prepare.

Serve the chicken with some chilli sauce on top, adding chuño and rice. Eat with a tomato and onion salad.

INGREDIENTS (for 8 portions)

  • 1 chicken
  • 250 grams of green peas (fresh, peeled or frozen)
  • 8 dehydrated cayenne peppers
  • 2 onions
  • 2 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 2 cloves of garlic
  • half a head of celery
  • 2 tbsp salt

INSTRUCTIONS

First, cut the chicken into large portions and place in a cooking pot. Add a little salt, 1 whole onion (you can halve it), celery, 1 whole clove of garlic and enough water to cover the chicken. Boil for 20 minutes until the chicken is soft. Stir occasionally. When the chicken is ready, take it out of the water and leave it aside. Do not throw out the water where the chicken was cooked as you will use that for preparing your rice.

Lightly boil the peas and drain.

Then, we need to get ready the spicy sauce for the chicken. (It is really easy and simple to make. I recommend having it ready in advance, so it saves you some time since you can freeze this spicy sauce.)

Cut the heads of the dry red cayenne peppers, remove the stems and seeds. (Red peppers can be very spicy so we need to take the seeds out and leave them very clean.) Put them into hot water for about 10 – 15 minutes. When you see the skins of the peppers start getting loose, you know they are ready.

Drain, and put them in the blender with two cups of water (you can use the water the chicken was cooked in) for about 2 minutes until it is very smooth. Set this sauce aside.

Meanwhile, chop 1 onion really small and put it in a large pot with 2 tbsp of salt and 2 tbsp of oil. Fry the onion for about 5 min until the onion crystalizes.

Once that is dry, add the blended spicy cayenne peppers sauce with the chicken. Let it cook for about 15 mins on a low heat until the chicken is tender, stirring from time to time so it doesn’t get burned on the bottom.

It is very important that the sauce doesn’t dry too much and the chicken is not too overcooked. The sauce is thick enough, and the onions are well cooked if you can barely see them in the sauce.

Sprinkle the green peas over the chicken sauce when serving.

Cooking the Rice

  • 4 cups of rice
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 2 tbsp of oil
  • 8 cups water
  • 1 tbsp salt

Fry the rice in 2 tablespoons of oil, add salt, and diced garlic, stirring continuously for about 5 minutes. When the rice is golden brown, add enough water to cover the rice and let it boil on low heat, without stirring, until it becomes soft – about 20 minutes.

Cooking the Chuño (Freeze dried potatoes)

Chuño is really hard to find here in Canada, but as an alternative, you can use mashed potatoes. Basically, Chuño is frozen potato that has been dried in the sun. If you find chuño, it will be dry. You need to let it soak all night and next day, and then break it into pieces with your hands. Once the chuño is in small pieces, wash it one time.

  • 4 cups chuño
  • ½ cup regular milk
  • 1 small onion (chopped)
  • 1 garlic (chopped)
  • water
  • 3 tsp salt
  • 2 tbsp oil
  • 1/2 kg shredded cheese (Mozzarella)

Boil some water, add the chuño and some salt. Cook for about 20 mins. Rinse and set aside. You will see that the colour of the chuño changes from milky white to clear and dark.

While the chuño is cooking, dice the onion and garlic. Cook the onion and garlic with the oil and salt until the onion looks wrinkly. Add the chuño and the milk. Stir for about 1 minute, and then add the shredded cheese until the cheese melts.

Serve the spicy chicken and sprinkle the green peas over it, add chuño and rice and now you are ready to serve the Bolivian spicy dish.

Japanese Multicultural Community Kitchen

Would you like to learn how to prepare a traditional Japanese dish? Then why not come and join us on Thursday, October 12th….

 

Our Japanese chef Rumi, will teach us how to prepare Miso Soup, that is one of the main items in the Japanese kitchen, then Okonomiyaki, Japanese savory pancakes, containing a variety of ingredients, and as a dessert she will serve Shiratama Dango, sweet glutinous rice dumplings.

Space is limited to the first 10 participants, so be quick! Let me know who is interested in coming by email info@welcomewhistler.com or call me on 604.388.5511

$10 by Donation

Children welcome!

Nutrition Workshop “LIFE WITHOUT DAIRY”

Join our Nutrition Workshop this Friday, September 29, 2017, 10:00-12:00pm at the Whistler Public Library.

Come learn alternative sources of calcium and tips on how to maintain positive calcium balance in the body for strong bones.
We invited Sarah, experienced nutritionist, certified Plant Based Chef to tell us more about Dairy alternatives.

Bake Sale for Whistler Multicultural Festival

Share the best baking goods with Whistler residence and let them taste flavors from your homeland. Donate pastries for Whistler Multicultural Festival. How to do it?

If you want to support us, please bring your homemade baked goods for us to sell at the Festival! All food must be low risk, which means just baked goods (no meat or dairy fillings, and no jellies or pickles), and wrapped either in plastic foil or ideally in zip lock bags. We also ask you to provide the name of what you’ve baked, and any interesting details about it (where it’s from, when people eat it etc).

Read more in the flyer, if you have any questions contact Barbora – call 6049672422 or email info@welcomewhistler.com

May Calendar

May is here and Whistler Multicultural Network have so many fun events ready for you!

We start strong on the first week with Nutrition Workshop on Friday, Pitch in Day on Saturday and Photo Workshop and Spring Potluck on Sunday.

In the following weeks you will see more events, which will get us ready for the Whistler Multicultural Festival – like amazing Pinata workshop with Elisa.

Good news is, that Whistler Multicultural Kitchens are back – the first flavors we discover will be Taiwanese – Chia Chia will teach us how to cook traditional food from her home land on May 16.

For more details, please check event calendar or contact Barbora on 6043885511 or info@welcomewhistler.com

We celebrated Chinese New Year with Green Onion Pancakes

Year 2017 is year of rooster and we celebrated during Friday Welcome Centre drop-in hours. Thanks to Li and Vanessa we have been lucky enough to taste some original Chinese recipes. And because the food was amazing, we decided to share one recipe with everyone.

Take a moment and try something new – you will have no trouble to find all the ingredients and to create this budget friendly meal.

 

Green Onion Pancakes

Ingredients (makes 8 pieces):

1 1/2 cups (200 g) all-purpose flour

1 1/2 tsp salt (I recommend a little less)

1/2 cup (125 ml) water

3 green onions (green parts only, trimmed and cut into small rounds, about 1/3 cup)

2 tbsp oil (canola oil or vegetable oil )

some additional all-purpose flour for dusting and rolling

oil for frying

How to make green onion pancake:

1. Sift the all-purpose flour into a big bowl and then add the salt into the flour. Combine well and set aside.

2. Bring the water to a boil. Slowly add the water to the flour and knead the dough until it is no longer sticky and the surface becomes smooth,about 10 minutes. Cover the dough with a damp cloth and let it rest for 30 minutes.

3. Add the green onion into the dough.

4. On a flat and floured surface divide the dough into 8 equal-sized pieces. Roll each piece of dough into a ball using your palm. Working with one dough ball at a time, roll the dough to a thin disc using a rolling pin. Brush the surface of the disc with the oil.Roll the dough into a cylinder.

5. Coil it up like a snail. Roll the dough until flat. Set the dough aside on a baking sheet. Repeat for the rest of the dough.

6. Add oil into a frying  pan over moderated heat. Transfer a piece of pancake into the pan. Fry each side of the pancake to a light golden brown, about 1 minute. Flip the pancake over and fry the other side. Add more oil, repeat the same for the remaining pancakes and serve immediately.

Korean Community Kitchen

The PMN will be offering a Korean Community Kitchen on Friday, January 20 from 11:30-1:30 at the Sea to Sky Community Services Program House.

Korea is a state in East Asia with a population of 74 million that is divided into 2 parts: North and South Korea.  Korean meals are based on rice, vegetables and meats with a large portion of side dishes.  A few popular dishes include kimchi and bibimbap.

If you would like to learn how to make a traditional Korean dish please sign up by Tuesday, January 17 on our Facebook page or contact Anni Kolbe at anni.kolbe@sscs.ca.